Viewing entries tagged
depression

Sexual Assault & Mental Health

Sexual Assault & Mental Health

Around 1 in 5 women and 1 in 59 men have reported experiencing rape at some point in their lives, while about 1 in 20 men and women experienced other types of sexual violence.  Among female rape victims, 51.1% of perpetrators were reported to be intimate partners, 12.5% were family members, 40.8% were reported to be acquaintances, and 13.8% were strangers.  Among male victims, 52.4% of perpetrators were reported to be acquaintances and 15.1% were strangers.

Seasonal Affective Disorder

Seasonal Affective Disorder

Seasonal Affective Disorder is a mood disorder that is classified by depressive symptoms that occur within the same season each year, usually winter.  It is commonly thought that SAD is the result of biochemical imbalances that occur with shorter daylight hours lessening amounts of sunlight. As seasons change, people experience a shift in their biological internal clock or circadian rhythm that can cause them to be out of step with their daily schedule.  A  second, less common type of seasonal affective disorder occurs in the summer months in individuals who live in warmer climates. This type of depression is related to heat and humidity, rather than light.

3 Do's and Don'ts of Men's Mental Health

3 Comments

3 Do's and Don'ts of Men's Mental Health

novembercoverphoto.jpg

The prevailing perceptions of “macho” masculinity and what it means to be “a man” in America have long overshadowed critical issues related to men’s mental health -- until now. NoStigmas wants to talk about you, guys!

We know that mental health issues do not discriminate by gender. Depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, eating disorders and other major mental health issues similarly affect both men and women. So why are men, on average, three times more likely than women to die by suicide?

Accurately recognizing the warning signs of a mental health condition is sometimes difficult, and sometimes men (and women) are not in-tune with their emotions. Men may feel added social pressures to be bold, confident, and stoic. Popular culture reinforces the image of the “masculine man” as powerful, courageous, competitive and successful.

While these traits are admirable, they are deserving of compromise. The social construction of masculinity is problematic because it does not leave room for anxieties, doubts, misconceptions or struggles. Reality tells us that life is full of little (and big!) anxieties and struggles. We want to help our men prioritize their mental health habits and manage their “emotional teaspoons”. Let’s #RedefineNormal and let our men know - You are not alone.

  1. DO talk to a loved one, a trusted friend, or a professional health provider at the first indication of a mental health issue. Talk to us, even! You can request a NoStigmas mentor here.
  2. DO maintain a healthy diet and engage in moderate physical activity 2-3 times a week. Watching your waistline and other key health numbers (like blood pressure and cholesterol) will also benefit your long-term health. Check out the 6 biggest trend shifts in fitness here.
  3. DO reflect on yourself. This is essential to self-management! Take time out of your day to think and reflect on present irritations, hopes and pleasures, and immediate or future plans. If a journal isn’t quite your style, try taking this step and installing this personal health template from Microsoft Office to your personal computer. It downloads directly to Microsoft Excel, and the rest is health history!
  1. DON’T consume excess alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so only in moderation. For men younger than age 65, alcohol consumption is considered moderate if individuals consume up to two drinks per day. One drink is equivalent to a 12 oz. beer, a 5 oz. glass of wine, or a 1.5 oz. shot (80 proof).
  2. DON’T mess with your sleep schedule. Our quality of sleep influences how much food we consume, our metabolism speed, and how well we cope with our stress. Check out these 7 steps to better sleep.
  3. DON’T use tobacco products. Smoking is among the unhealthiest vices known to man. To pick up a healthier habit, try these mediation tips for beginners.

Visit our Learning Center to learn more about men's mental health!  Also, check out some other "manly" support systems:

http://movember.com

http://mantherapy.com

http://menshealth.com

3 Comments

Mental Health and the Military

Mental Health and the Military

Post-traumatic stress disorder is not the only mental health issue among military veterans and active personnel. What are some other mental health problems and how can we help? 

Men's Mental Health

1 Comment

Men's Mental Health

In the U.S., approximately five million men experience depression in a given year. Male depression is a serious mental disorder and needs immediate treatment. Yet, it often goes untreated and underdiagnosed in men.

1 Comment

6 BARRIERS TO MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES: ATTITUDINAL BARRIERS

1 Comment

6 BARRIERS TO MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES: ATTITUDINAL BARRIERS

barrier_one-header.jpg

BARRIER #1: ATTITUDINAL BARRIERS

Attitudinal barriers commonly cause those living with mental illness to avoid seeking mental health services. These attitudinal barriers can include believing that a mental illness will resolve on its own or not believing in the beneficial aspects of psychiatric care.

As an example, look to a 2009 Psychiatric Services study which examined needs for mental health services in a sample of 272 veterans who met screening criteria for a mental health condition. Researchers found that negative beliefs about mental health services were strongly associated with concerns about barriers to care and an increased perception of mental illness stigma. Negative beliefs about mental health care were also associated with a decreased likelihood of mental health counseling in the six months prior to interview.

Can attitudinal barriers be adjusted?

Educational interventions introduced throughout the early school years could work to develop a better publicly-shared understanding about mental illness. Ideally, educational interventions would orient children and young adults toward social inclusion and pro-social action. Programs introduced during the final years of high school could include contact with a person living with mental illness; this person could contribute to the intervention process on a voluntary basis by sharing her/his experience of living with a mental health condition. Interventions successful in aiding the development of empathy toward those with mental illness may prove successful in removing attitudinal barriers toward mental health issues and treatment.

Strengthening support in local communities could be facilitated by the creation of weekly or monthly community meetings centered around mental health and well-being. Meetings would bring community members together with the shared goals of spreading information about mental health issues and resources, bolstering public support, and creating community bonds. If a wellness group is missing in your community, consider discussing with friends, family or town board members the possibility of starting a mental health and wellness group near you. The number of interested people may surprise you!

Note: Some organizations, such as NoStigmas and Mental Health America, provide a link for locating mental health support facilities across the country.

[button color="#8ba33b" size="small" link="https://www.nostigmas.org/mental_health_barrier_2/"]BARRIER #2: MENTAL ILLNESS STIGMAS -->[/button]

1 Comment

Depression

Depression

Depression is a serious condition that is different from ordinary feelings of sadness. While it is normal for people to feel down or unhappy from time to time, clinical depression is a persistent state of unhappiness, and can seriously disrupt how a person feels, thinks, or behaves. Many people who suffer from depression have difficulty functioning on a day-to-day basis; they can feel overwhelmed or consumed by their thoughts,  and often don’t find pleasure in activities or hobbies they used to enjoy.

The NoStigmas Movement

1 Comment

The NoStigmas Movement

Approximately 2,000 people took their own lives on 18 January 1987; Michael Daniel Moore was one of them. He left behind a wife and three children ages seven, six, and three. He was neither a bad nor a stupid person. He was a person in pain and sa...

1 Comment

Seal of Transparency
2018 Top-Rated Nonprofit on GreatNonprofits.org
Want to volunteer, donate, or review?   Visit GreatNonprofits.org.