Viewing entries tagged
veteran

PTSD Pottery

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PTSD Pottery

For me, working with clay and ceramics is the ideal distraction to keep me off the drink. It’s hard to throw a pot with a can of Fosters in my hand! I find it relaxing and it helps to reduce my anxiety – all food for helping with the symptoms of PTSD.

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Still fighting

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Still fighting

i have dealt with depression for damn near all my life always being a loner not caring to have many friends and sit in a dark room and listen to music.. this is true even now but as a survivor of multiple suicide and self harm going on 5 years sober and still fighting the good fight. I’m also a amateur mma fighter he helps keep my mind clam and sharp the skills i learned have helped me over come self esteem problems and helped me deal with ptsd.. my coach says im his hero and says i help keep him motivated i love him as my brother.. having bipolar disorder and anxiety disorders its like a constant battle with my own mind im strong by the love of my wife and children they are my life and gave me the strength to over come my addictions and stay focused on my road to recovery.. in this journey i have spread my story across my state and helped inspire hope and help end stigmas that may be placed in there heads about people with mental illnesses and substance abuse.. i am a husband a father and a marine and above all i am not my diagnoses and i have a voice and it will be heard    


Submitted by - Louis Nagle (coachnagle@gmail.com)

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Today is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Awareness Day

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By Amanda Reimer

Imagine you’re going about your day—maybe you’re walking in the park with a friend. Suddenly you’re reliving your worst memories, fearful for your life.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder can affect anyone. Though stereotypes will say PTSD is caused by war, there are many other causes ranging from sexual assault, to a severe injury, to the threat of death.

Like its name says, PTSD can occur after anything traumatic. Nowadays, PTSD is even becoming common in children, as the number of school shootings elevates.

But the good news is that there are ways to cope with PTSD. In addition to the well-known therapy and medication options, there are many other resources for recovery and treatment.

For some, like Iraq veteran Roque Rodriguez-Urena, they find it in exercise. Exercise not only allows patients to get moving, but also releases endorphins that help improve moods.

Iraq veteran with PTSD finds healing in exercise

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In fact, Mental Health America recommends exercise as part of a self-care routine for PTSD patients to help improve sleep and relieve muscle tension and anxiety.

Others have found more creative recovery devices for PTSD from journaling to therapy dogs—the latter, which is becoming more common.

Therapy dogs can help by providing companionship and calming their owners, as well as by preventing crowds of people from moving too closely or quickly around their owner.

How dogs can help veterans overcome PTSD

So, what can you do to help bring awareness to PTSD? The National Center for PTSD says the first step is to learn. Those wishing to learn more about PTSD can participate in the National Center for PTSD’s online PTSD 101 course, or other free in-depth professional courses.

From there, the next step is to reach out and share. June is a great time to connect because it is PTSD awareness month, but there are people looking for connections on any given day.

    PTSD can feel like a living nightmare, but no one has to face it alone. It’s time to stand together.  

    Please visit nostigmas.org/anxiety-disorders to learn more about PTSD and other anxiety disorders.  

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